request proposals – Mingkem http://mingkem.com/ Sat, 26 Mar 2022 02:08:02 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.9.3 https://mingkem.com/wp-content/uploads/2021/10/icon-7-120x120.png request proposals – Mingkem http://mingkem.com/ 32 32 KED suitors concerned about fairness of bidding process https://mingkem.com/ked-suitors-concerned-about-fairness-of-bidding-process/ Thu, 10 Mar 2022 01:49:34 +0000 https://mingkem.com/ked-suitors-concerned-about-fairness-of-bidding-process/ Breadcrumb Links News Local News “The city has taken several steps to ensure this bidding process is fair, open and transparent,” the municipality said. Publication date : March 09, 2022 • 22 hours ago • 4 minute read The east entrance to the Kingsway Entertainment District. The city has issued a tender for the design […]]]>

“The city has taken several steps to ensure this bidding process is fair, open and transparent,” the municipality said.

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There are concerns that a local developer has gained an unfair advantage over a project seen as one of the biggest in the city’s history.

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Dario Zulich is the developer of the Kingsway Entertainment District – he sold the land for an event center to the city for $10 – and he co-owns the land surrounding the event center, including the plots set aside for a casino and hotel.

It owns the Sudbury Wolves and the Sudbury Five, which will become two of the center’s main tenants when it opens. Additionally, Zulich is involved in the casino and hotel; in fact, it was Zulich who announced last year that Genesis Hospitality would build and operate a hotel at KED.

The two Terraprobe geotechnical reports, commissioned in 2011 and 2013, are addressed to Zulich.

Finally, Zulich is listed as co-CEO of TESC Contracting Ltd., and the website says he’s owned the company since 2000. Kitchener-based Ball Construction, which works with TESC, is one of three companies that the city has shortlisted to design and build the event center.

With all of this in mind, the other bidders had questions about the transparency of the city’s bidding process.

Bidders asked several questions about conflict of interest. The city has described its definition of conflict of interest, as well as its implications, in the RFP, or request for proposals.

“How does the city deal with the conflict of interest that exists over the fact that Dario Zulich is the developer who entered into an overall cost sharing agreement with the city for the KED and is also the CEO of TESC Contracting Company Ltd., one of the shortlisted bidders for this tender? asked one of the bidders (they remain unidentified in the document).

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While the city said it recognized the bidders had concerns, it confirmed that no one involved in the tender was involved in preparing the RFP.

“The city has taken several steps to ensure this bidding process is fair, open and transparent,” the city responded. “Once the design-build teams have identified their team members, the compliance team will sign a full relationship review and they will be required to sign a conflict of interest declaration.

“In addition, the City has retained the services of a fairness monitor. The Controller’s role will be to monitor and review the procurement process from the development of the bid solicitation through to contract award. »

The city said Mississauga-based Ball/TESC, EllisDon and PCL Constructors were shortlisted ahead of the June 2017 vote in which council voted to locate the center of events at KED.

The bidders also had concerns about various aspects of the evaluation criteria, which they felt were biased in favor of Zulich.

Several questions were asked about the fees to be paid to unsuccessful bidders. Some promoters felt that the amount offered was insufficient, while others expressed concern about the ambiguous wording.

Finally, a bidder asked about the OPP’s corruption investigation that is currently underway.

The city said it was not aware of “any of the developers engaging in professional misconduct.”

The City of Greater Sudbury issued a request for proposals earlier this year for the design and construction of the event center at KED.

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Bidding on large projects like KED is costly and time-consuming. A team often collaborates and the process usually involves several steps over several months.

To level the playing field, a question and answer period was part of the bid solicitation process. The 14-page document includes 40 questions covering various aspects of the application process as well as the municipality’s expectations. This allows bidders to raise concerns and seek clarification.

An evaluation team made up of municipal employees and external architects will evaluate the proposals. A fairness monitor will ensure that the process is transparent, free and fair.

The KED will include a $100 million event center paid for by local taxpayers; a $60 million casino built and operated by BC-based Gateway Casinos; and an upscale hotel, owned and operated by Manitoba-based Genesis Hospitality. Its opening is scheduled for 2025.

While the city states on its website that the capital budget to build the event center is at least $100 million – critics of the project have argued due to recent increases in construction costs, the KED is now hovering around $113 million – in RFP documents, the project is valued at a maximum of $92 million.

“The city has a budget of $92 million, excluding HST. This budget includes all costs, including but not limited to the cost of services and design-build works, as well as contingencies for event center price risks,” the RFP states. . “Proposals received with a financial proposal higher than the budget will be automatically rejected.”

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In questions and answers, the city said it is the bidder’s responsibility to “prepare a design and cost proposal within the limits of the city’s budget.”

Ian Wood, the city’s executive director of strategic initiatives, communications and citizen services, told the Star that the $8 million variance is the result of other costs associated with the event center, which do not not part of the construction of the building.

If this had been done, for example, site preparation would cost a total of $9.7 million, split between the municipality; Gateway Casinos; the hotelier; and Zulich. The city was to be responsible for $5.9 million, while Gateway would have paid $2.2 million. The hotelier would have covered $1.1 million and Zulich would have had to pay $530,000. Site preparation was postponed to last November, the day it was supposed to start. Gateway said they were putting the project on hold pending the results of an OPP corruption investigation and a legal action by the Minnow Lake Restoration Group.

The police investigation was launched last year after Ward 3 Coun. Gerry Montpellier said representatives from Gateway Casinos and Zulich approached him to try to influence his 2017 vote on the location of the event center. Montpellier abstained from voting.

The solicitation period ends in June. Bidders must submit their bids by June 9 at 1:30 p.m.

mkkeown@postmedia.com
Twitter: @marykkeown
Facebook: @mkkeown

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Critics question Memphis power supply bidding process https://mingkem.com/critics-question-memphis-power-supply-bidding-process/ Wed, 09 Feb 2022 21:56:33 +0000 https://mingkem.com/critics-question-memphis-power-supply-bidding-process/ A pair of businessmen pushing Memphis, Light, Gas and Water to quit the Tennessee Valley Authority aired a long list of grievances on Wednesday about the utility’s conduct in bidding on its power supply and pushed Memphis Mayor Jim Strickland to oversee the process. The letter sent to Strickland, the Memphis City Council and members […]]]>

A pair of businessmen pushing Memphis, Light, Gas and Water to quit the Tennessee Valley Authority aired a long list of grievances on Wednesday about the utility’s conduct in bidding on its power supply and pushed Memphis Mayor Jim Strickland to oversee the process.

The letter sent to Strickland, the Memphis City Council and members of MLGW’s board of directors is another salvo from a group that has long been suspicious of how MLGW would conduct the bidding on its power supply. It is unclear what action Strickland will take in response to the letter, if any.

The letter came out the same day that companies bidding for Memphis power supply were supposed to submit fixes to any questions MLGW had on their bids. He also spoke on the seventh day of widespread power outages and he said any potential savings from the TVA exit could be used to pay for infrastructure improvements and prevent future outages.

Jim Gilliland and Karl Schledwitz, two influential Memphis businessmen who manage $450 million for Memphis, a nonprofit named for alleged savings Memphis could receive each year if it left TVA, wrote the letter and listed their complaints about the conduct of the bidding process.

Transmission lines run along I-240 near Poplar Avenue on Friday, March 5, 2021.

They claimed in their letter that MLGW was not following Strickland’s instructions on how the tender process – known as an RFP or request for proposals – should proceed. The couple asked Strickland to remove the frames that did not follow his instructions.

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UW System Orders Audit of UW-Madison Project Bidding Process | Higher Education https://mingkem.com/uw-system-orders-audit-of-uw-madison-project-bidding-process-higher-education/ Fri, 05 Mar 2021 08:00:00 +0000 https://mingkem.com/uw-system-orders-audit-of-uw-madison-project-bidding-process-higher-education/ The University of Wisconsin system ordered an audit late last month of UW-Madison’s bidding process for a major project just days before one of the companies not selected for the contract was due. raises concerns and calls for an investigation. Last year, UW-Madison sought out a vendor to help set up its Administrative transformation programa […]]]>

The University of Wisconsin system ordered an audit late last month of UW-Madison’s bidding process for a major project just days before one of the companies not selected for the contract was due. raises concerns and calls for an investigation.

Last year, UW-Madison sought out a vendor to help set up its Administrative transformation programa massive, multi-year project that will move the university’s administrative services, such as payroll, human resources and finance, to a more secure cloud-based system.

In the recent episode of Rewind: Your Week in Review, WisPolitics.com JR Ross, editor, and Jessie Opoien, editor of the Capital Times, discuss the nomination of former Governor Tommy Thompson as interim president of the UW system. This came after University of Alaska President Jim Johnsen stepped down from being the one and only nomination. Under current university policy, acting appointees cannot seek permanent employment unless they receive a waiver, and Thompson has asked to be paid the minimum salary of $489,334. UW Regents Karen Walsh, an Evers appointee, and Regent President Andrew Petersen, a Walker appointee, both support Thompson.

Watch the full program: https://wiseye.org/2020/06/19/rewind-your-week-in-review-for-june-13-19/

Learn more about Rewind: https://wiseye.org/category/rewind-your-week-in-review/

Subscribe to Morning Minute: https://wiseye.org/morning-minute/

#morningminute #rewind #wisconsineye


Acting system president Tommy Thompson called the project “absolutely essential” to modernizing budget management on campuses.

“However, it is critical that at every stage we solidly manage the project with full transparency and accountability,” he said in a statement Thursday announcing the commissioning of an independent review.

The system’s review of UW-Madison’s bidding process began in mid-February, days before one of the vendors, Deloitte Consulting, informed UW-Madison of its “serious concerns”.

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The Wisconsin procurement process requires that all vendors be notified of which vendor has been selected for the job. Companies that lost the contract then have a certain period of time to appeal to the Department of State Administration.

Thompson said the review stems from this “potential missed step.”

Deloitte alleges UW-Madison allowed two competitors, Huron and Accenture, to help craft part of the bid and then bid on the project — a process the company decried as “tainted with a lack of transparency, unequal treatment and conflicts of interest that cannot be tolerated in public procurement.

UW-Madison evaluated the companies through what is called a request for proposals. The university evaluated vendors based on the quality of their proposal and past experience, not just the amount they offered.

Huron and Accenture were awarded $808,000 and $819,000 contracts respectively to work on the first phase of the UW-Madison project, according to System.

In a letter to Deloitte on Monday, UW-Madison chief purchasing officer Lori Voss said the RFP was canceled Feb. 18 — five days before the company raised concerns in its Feb. 23 letter. February. She said the university would not solicit new offers until the review was completed.

“An audit will determine all the facts, but this process issue would not have materially impacted the awards made to two of the five vendors who submitted bids through this open and public process,” said the University spokesman John Lucas.

The System’s Office of Internal Audit conducts the review. The office reports to Thompson and the UW Board of Trustees, but has independent authority.


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